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Wickedness (Routledge Classics)

Wickedness Routledge Classics To look into the darkness of the human soul is a frightening venture Here Mary Midgley does so In Wickedness she sets out to delineate not so much the nature of wickedness as its actual sources Midgle

  • Title: Wickedness (Routledge Classics)
  • Author: Mary Midgley
  • ISBN: 9780415253987
  • Page: 436
  • Format: Paperback
  • To look into the darkness of the human soul is a frightening venture Here Mary Midgley does so In Wickedness she sets out to delineate not so much the nature of wickedness as its actual sources Midgley s analysis proves that the capacity for real wickedness is an inevitable part of human nature This is not however a blanket acceptance of evil She provides us with a frTo look into the darkness of the human soul is a frightening venture Here Mary Midgley does so In Wickedness she sets out to delineate not so much the nature of wickedness as its actual sources Midgley s analysis proves that the capacity for real wickedness is an inevitable part of human nature This is not however a blanket acceptance of evil She provides us with a framework that accepts its existence yet offers humankind the possibility of rejecting this part of our nature Out of this dark journey she returns with an offering to us an understanding of human nature that enhances our very humanity.

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      436 Mary Midgley
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      Posted by:Mary Midgley
      Published :2019-08-12T20:49:22+00:00

    About "Mary Midgley"

    1. Mary Midgley

      Mary Midgley is an English moral philosopher She was a Senior Lecturer in Philosophy at Newcastle University and is known for her work on science, ethics and animal rights.

    974 Comments

    1. Midgley's argument is that we have to stop thinking about wickedness as some sort of alien value system and instead see it as a malfunction in the usual set of motivations and impulses all humans share thanks to our evolutionary heritage. She summarizes this method nicely when she says:"This kind of account lays the main stress on the arrangement of the motives. It does not accept that human beings can invent new motives, or ‘invent values’ to which those new motives would correspond. Even t [...]


    2. Religious thought, and especially the formalizing aspects of theology, can have the effect of what I call “theologizing the natural.” When you theologize the natural, you take a perfectly earthly, human, natural occurrence or state and you attribute it to a higher power or function. This is what has essentially been done with the problem of human evil, or as Midgley calls it to avoid these overtly theological implications, “wickedness.” Instead of looking at the motivations for human beh [...]


    3. I don't normally read philosophical theory because it tends to make me angry. I feel it tends to reflect the views of the educated few and therefore cannot speak for everyone despite producing all encompassing social and moral theories. Consequently, I didn't find this particularly stimulating and felt that it rambled. I did like the section on the notion of the death-wish, but that was about it. I wasn't too keen on the deeply religious overtones relating to the idea of wickedness, as that is a [...]


    4. A grounded, reasonable approach to a complex and dramatic philosophical theme. Midgley's argument ranges over several topics in the general theme of "what is evil, and how does it come about in a world of reason and self-consistency?"Midgley never downplays the difficulty of the question. Instead, she strips away all evasions, dispensing with determinism and limpid relativism, and she addresses the question from an unrepentant realist point of view: there is truth and value in moral reasoning, e [...]


    5. This book takes a common sense, humanist view on the subject of defining the application of wickedness. Defined outside a religious conception and from an arguably British school of thinking, the concepts flow from Aristotle and Plato through Kant, Sartre, and Nietzsche, Freud and Jung, Shakespeare, Coleridge, and Milton to Darwin, C.S. Lewis, Erich Fromm and others to give a mostly coherent view of what wickedness or evil isn't and is.The review stops short of a full-blown, multi-disciplinary r [...]


    6. Good book about wickedness. Interesting concepts about evil not being a positive force eg devil but more a negative version of other characteristics eg. Lack of helping ppl. Not caring enough to stop hitler. Resonates with how we treat asylum seekers. Also great quote about needing to have no values if a great politician to concentrate on believing what ppl want or be a great communicator which is rare.


    7. read it for work. i thought it was very interesting. i didn't really get the central thesis until someone smarter than me told me. but, its the old, all you need for evil to triumph is for men to do nothing. sins of omission people!


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