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The Hunger

The Hunger Fifteen year old Paula s perfectionism drives every facet of her life from her marks in Grade to the pursuit of a perfect body A history project brings her face to face with her grandmother s earl

  • Title: The Hunger
  • Author: Marsha Forchuk Skrypuch
  • ISBN: 9781895681161
  • Page: 323
  • Format: Paperback
  • Fifteen year old Paula s perfectionism drives every facet of her life, from her marks in Grade 10 to the pursuit of a perfect body A history project brings her face to face with her grandmother s early life and, as she delves deeper, she is disturbed to find eerie parallels between her own struggles and what she learns of the past.As Paula slowly destroys the very bodyFifteen year old Paula s perfectionism drives every facet of her life, from her marks in Grade 10 to the pursuit of a perfect body A history project brings her face to face with her grandmother s early life and, as she delves deeper, she is disturbed to find eerie parallels between her own struggles and what she learns of the past.As Paula slowly destroys the very body she s trying to perfect, her spirit is torn between settling for her imperfect life or entering the shadowy mystery of her grandmother s Armenian past The shimmering Euphrates River beckons her, but, as she soon discovers, there are many things worse than imperfection.

    • Best Download [Marsha Forchuk Skrypuch] ↠ The Hunger || [Religion Book] PDF ↠
      323 Marsha Forchuk Skrypuch
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      Posted by:Marsha Forchuk Skrypuch
      Published :2019-02-11T12:06:47+00:00

    About "Marsha Forchuk Skrypuch"

    1. Marsha Forchuk Skrypuch

      Marsha has received numerous awards and honours for her picture books and young adult novels, including a nomination for the Canadian Library Association Book of the Year in 2007 Marsha has penned the bestselling Dear Canada book, Prisoners in the Promised Land.In 2008, Marsha was awarded the Order of Princess Olha by the Ukranian President, in recognition of her story, Enough, which described the great Ukranian famine that claimed millions of lives in the 1930s.Surprisingly, up until the fourth grade, Marsha did not know how to read She says that after she failed a provincial test, she taught herself how to read with Oliver Twist and it took her a year to complete Ever since, Marsha read as many books as she could get her hands on, and had a new dream of becoming an author After completing an English and Library Science degree, backpacking across Europe, and working as an industrial sales rep, Marsha eventually focused on writing After a hundred rejections, her first book was published in 1996.

    461 Comments

    1. Bluntly, The Hunger by Marsha Forchuk Skrypuch has been a flawed book. Several other mixed reviews mention its positive aspects: the historical accuracy, the evidence of research done for the latter half of the novel. They also mention the negative, weaker aspects, which I too picked up on. They include a certain rocky transition, which I thought was the weakest point and will discuss later, and a lack of character depth, which is an opinion some may not share.The book revolves around two charac [...]


    2. What a gripping description of bulimia! I don't think I've ever read one so realistic. I can only hope that the author isn't writing from experience. I was getting nauseous just reading about the vomiting! However, I now feel, as I never did before, that I really understand what it's like to think like a bulimic. If the story had been solely about Paula and her battle with bulimia, I would have given it 5 stars.However, over halfway through the story it switched to a near-death experience, where [...]


    3. Mmry, very typical late-90s treatment of eating disorders, but with one notable twist: Hunger ties in the Armenian Genocide through Paula's understanding of her grandmother's experience. There's a big chunk of that in the second half of the book, but I would have loved to see more of it sooner—I know so little about the genocide, and I didn't come out of the book with all that more of an understanding. Part of that, I think, is that Paula doesn't know anything about it either, at the beginning [...]


    4. “The Hunger” by Marsha Forchuk Skrypuch was quite honestly a mediocre read. Centered around 15-year-old Paula, the novel focuses on her battle to attain the ideal figure and the personal struggles she confronts throughout her battle with bulimia. However, more than partway through the story, the perspective changes as Paula is transported back in time to the early 1900s. She delves into the life of Marta, a young Armenian girl on the brink of death during the Armenian Massacre of the first W [...]


    5. Paula is a typical fifteen year old whose life revolves around her looks, and body image. Paula is a perfectionist and she has this goal to achieve the perfect body. Then at school she is tasked with a history project and she goes to her grandma for help. As she learns about her grandmas past she notices similarities between her life and the past. Slowly Paula is ruining her body and eventually she has to make a choice. Choose to live an imperfect life where she can't achieve the perfect body or [...]


    6. It was so good to reread this book again, I believe this might be the only historical fiction novel I've ever read and it was so good. The main character is relatable in the way that she's struggling with the public and how she feels about her image as well as educates on the facts of anorexia and bulimia. As for the historical fiction part. I was very surprised when I first read this and found that I like the historical fiction parts, which now that I'm rereading it I feel like I can finally mo [...]


    7. I have been an avid reader of all of Skrypuch's books and have been impressed with them all. She writes well-researched books that draw on the reader's emotions and empathy and she presents information that is not prominent in publishing yet still accessible. This title fell short of that precedent. The link between the main character's eating disorder in the present and her past life experience of her great grandmother and aunt during the Armenian genocide felt odd and disconnected. I feel that [...]


    8. Paula’s parents don’t notice when she turns anorexic/bulimic because dad is too busy being proud at her running and mom is too busy with her own life. Trying to complete a history project, she begins to delve into her grandmother’s past. The past becomes all too real when Paula’s body shuts down because of self starvation and she is sucked into reliving her great grandmother’s history as an Armenian orphan struggling to survive in the midst of the Armenian Turkish massacres of the earl [...]


    9. I was looking for a book about the Armenian genocide to use with a class of teenagers. This was recommended to me, and it certainly is an interesting book to read with a class - but the focus is much more on eating disorders than the Armenian genocide. I'm pretty sure this would not work well with the group of boys I'll have in that class, although it's clear that anorexia is not a "girls only" theme.So as a book about the journey of an anorexic, it's very good - at times borderline TMI, but I t [...]




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